Lamborghini Unveils a Self-Healing, Electric Supercar

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Lamborghini also intends to make the supercapacitors out of carbon-fiber panels that can be used to form the body of the car, so the Terzo Millennio draws energy from its own body. In other words: The car itself is the battery.

Moreover, the concept promises a car that will be able to continuously monitor the condition of its own structure, detecting wear and damage. Micro-channels containing “healing chemistries” in the carbon-fiber body will automatically repair small cracks that would otherwise spread.

To top—or, more accurately, bottom—it all off, the company will develop in-wheel electric motors, which would eliminate the need for a single large engine.

“Collaborating with MIT for our R&D department is an exceptional opportunity to do what Lamborghini has always been very good at—rewriting the rules on super sports cars,” says Stefano Domenicali, chairman and chief executive officer of Automobili Lamborghini.

Lamborghini got its start in the 1960s in Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy, when Ferruccio Lamborghini, a tractor maker who had become a wealthy industrialist, decided he wanted to top Ferrari. Today it is part of Volkswagen AG, and its cars start at around $200,000. There is neither price guidance nor a timeline on the Terzo Millennio; a production model won’t be available for years, if ever. Still, affordability isn’t a concept we can see Lamborghini exploring.